Birds, Animals, Plants, Nature, Social & Political Comment. 

Dusky Woodswallow

The Dusky Woodswallow is actually a misnomer. This bird is not closely related to swallows. They are more closely related to Butcherbirds, Currawongs and the Magpie according to information from Wikipedia.

They are found in woodlands in Eastern and Southern Australia and gather communally. In the south east of Australia, the birds migrate north in the Autumn.  Quite frankly I don’t blame them as I like to do the same.

Wikipedia Information

Feeding and diet

The diet of the bird can be varied. They eat various forms of foliage and other grassy material that they find on the ground on in trees and shrubs. Dusky woodswallows have been seen eating termites, butterflies and other insects. They also eat nectar from flowers. One notable aspect of their feeding habits is the way they hunt flying insects, which is done by picking them up on their wing.[5] They do, however, also eat their prey from the ground, and they often find inconspicuous places to perch while waiting for prey, such as utility lines and the like. They have also been observed engaging in kleptoparasitism, working as a group to rob a restless flycatcher of its prey. Kleptoparasitism is extremely unusual in passerine birds, as is cooperative kleptoparasitsim in general.

Breeding

The nest of the dusky woodswallow consists of twigs, roots and other similar foliage matted together to form a bowl shape, which is lined with grass. It is positioned safely, behind bark, and/or high in a tree branch, and sometimes in a hollowed out tree stump. The nest is made during the period from August to January, and with the help of several birds. The mated pair will then guard the nest, while others will help them take care of the babies. The female lays white eggs, of which there are usually no more than three or four. While the incubation period lasts for sixteen days, the amount of time taken for fledgling can be this long to around twenty days. The typical clutch is three to four in size, but this may vary.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *